News & Upcoming Events

  • Shingkhar Rabney, Ura, Bumthang, 20th October, 24th October
  • Jakar Tshechu, Jakar Dzong, Choekhor, Bumthang, 22nd October, 25th October
  • Jambay Lhakhang Drup, Jambay Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 29th October, 1st November
  • Sumdrang Kangsol, Sumdrang Lhakhang, Ura, Bumthang, 11th November, 13th November
  • Crane Festival, Gangtey Gonpa, Phobjikha, Wangduephodrang, 11th November
  • Mongar Tshechu, Mongar Dzong, Mongar, 20th November, 23rd November
  • Trashigang Tshechu, Trashigang Dzong, Trashigang, 21st November, 24th November
  • Tang Namkha Rabney, Tang Namkha, Lhakhang, Tang, Bumthang, 21st November, 23rd November
  • Jambay Lakhang Singye Cham, Jambay Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 28th November
  • Chojam Rabney, Chojamrab Lhakhang, Tang, Bumthang, 27th November, 29th November
  • Nalakhar Tshechu, Ngaa Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 28th November, 30th November
  • Pemagatshel Tshechu, Pemagatshel Dzong, Pemagatshel, 20th November, 23rd November
  • Trongsa Tshechu, Trongsa Dzong, Trongsa, 21st December, 23rd December
  • Lhuentse Tshechu, Lhuentse Dzong, Lhuentse, 21st December, 23rd December
  • Shingkhar Metochodpa, Shingkhar Lhakhang,Ura, Bumthang, 28th December
  • Nabji Lhakhang Drup, Nabji Lhakhang, Nabji, Trongsa, 28th December, 01st Jan 2013
  • Punakha Drubchhen, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, 15th February, 19th February
  • Punakha Tshechu, Punakha Dzong, Punakha, 20th February, 22nd February
  • Chhorten Kora, Tharpaling Lhakhang, Chummi, Bumthang, 25th February, 11th March
  • Gomphukora, Gom Kora Lhakhang, Trashigang, 20th March, 22nd March
  • Paro Tshechu, Rinpung Dzong, Paro, 23rd March, 27th March
  • Chhukha Tshechu, Chhukha Dzong, Chhukha, 25th March, 27th March
  • Ura Yakchoe, Ura Lhakhang, Bumthang, 21st April, 25th April
  • Nimalung Tshechu, Nimalung Dratshang, Chummi, Bumthang, 16th June, 18th June
  • Nimalung Tshechu, Kurjey Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 18th June
  • Thimphu Drubchen, Tashi Chhodzong, Thimphu, 09th September, 13th September
  • Wangdue Tshechu, Wangdi Dzong, Wangduephodrang, 12th September, 14th September
  • Tamshing Phala Chhoepa, Tamshing Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 13th September, 15th September
  • Thimphu Tshechu, Tashi Chhodzong, Thimphu, 14th September, 16th September
  • ThangbiI Mani, Tangbi Lhakhang, Choekor, Bumthang, 18th September, 20th September
  • Jambay Lhakhang Drup, Jambay Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 18th October, 22nd October
  • Takin Festival, Damji, GASA, 21st October, 23st February
  • Crane Festival, Gangtey Gonpa, Phobjikha, Wangduephodrang, 11th November
  • Mongar Tshechu, Mongar Dzong, Mongar, 09th November, 12th November
  • Pemagatshel Tshechu, Pemagatshel Dzong, Pemagatshel, 09th November, 12th November
  • Trashigang Tshechu, Trashigang Dzong, Trashigang, 10th November, 13th November
  • Nalakhar Tshechu, Ngaa Lhakhang, Choekhor, Bumthang, 17th November, 19th November
  • Trongsa Tshechu, Trongsa Dzong, Trongsa, 09th January 14, 11th January 14
  • Lhuentse Tshechu, Lhuentse Dzong, Lhuentse, 09th January 14, 11th January 14
  • Takin Festival, Damji, Gasa, 21st February, 23rd February
  • Nomad Festival, Nagsephel, Bumthang, 23rd February, 25th February
  • Tharpaling Thongdrol, Tharpaling lhakhang,Chummi, bumthang, 25th February
  • Talo Tshechu, Talo gonpa, Punakha, 20th March, 22nd March
  • Zhemgang Tshechu, Zhemgang dzong,Zhemgang, 20th March, 23rd March
  • Domkhar Tshechu, Domkhar, chummi, Bumthang, 20th April, 22nd April
  • Rhododendron Festival, Lamperi Botanical Garden,Dochula, Thimphu, 11th May, 13th May
  • Kurjey Tshechu, Kurjey lhakhang, choekhor,Bumthang, 18th June
  • Haa Summer Festival, Town festival ground,Haa, 6th July, 8th July
  • Masutaki mushroomFestival, Ura,Bumthang, 17th August, 19th August
  • Tour of the dragon (bicycle race), Bumthang to Thimphu, 7th September
  • Gangtey Tshechu, Gangtey gonpa, phobjikha,Wangduephodrang, 13th September, 15th September
  • Gasa Tshechu, Gasa Dzong, Gasa, 14th September, 16th September
  • Jakar Tshechu, Jakar Dzong, Choekhor, Bumthang, 12th October, 15th October
  • Prakhar Duchhoed, Prakar Lhakhang, Chummi, Bumthang, 19th October, 21st October
  • Black necked crane Festival, Gangtey Gonpa, Phobjikha, Wangduephodrang, 11th November
  • Jambay lakhang Singye cham, Jambay lhakhang, choekhor, Bumthang, 17th November
  • Druk wangyel Tshechu, Dochula, Thimphu, 13th December
  • Nabji Lhakhang Drup, Nabji Lhakhang, Nabji, Trongsa, 15th January, 19th January 2014

About Bhutan

A tiny landlocked Kingdom in the Himalayas, Bhutan is a Buddhist state enclosed in a cocoon of time with a population of just over 700,000 people and an area of 38,394 square kilometers. Known popularly to the world outside as the “Land of the Thunder Dragon”, the “Gross National Happiness (GNH) Country” and even as the “Last Shangri-La”, Bhutan has a very rich history, visible today in its unique culture and traditions that have been proudly pass down through the generations and retained in all its splendor. From its wooded hillsides to its cultivated valleys, Bhutan’s landscape bears witness to the profound faith shared by its entire people. Monasteries, chortens and prayer flags are to be found along every track and even in the remotest corners of the mountains.   It is a country of simple but extraordinary dimensions and a haven of Buddhist peace, far from the noise and bustle of the great cities. Though very young as a nation state, the country is believed to have been inhabited as early as 2000 B.C; evident from discoveries of remnants of ancient stone implements, earthenware and stone structures from its different regions.

 

From a nature-worshipping race, the people slowly converted to Buddhism after the arrival of Buddhist Saints and Lamas (learned Buddhist teachers) mostly from Tibet from as early as the 8th century. Originally divided among different warring rulers, the country was unified as a nation-state in the late 17th century by a Tibetan Lama Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, who had fled Tibet following a dispute over the throne of the traditional Drukpa Kagyud seat and estate of Ralung. Most of the majestic Dzongs (fortresses) seen in Bhutan today were built by him. These formidable and strategically located fortresses acted as the line of defense against foreign invasions while also serving as centers for administration.

 

Soon after the Zhabdrung’s demise and after much civil strife followed by a war with the British in India, the people unanimously elected Gongsar Ugyen Wangchuck as their first hereditary Monarch on 17th December, 1907. Thus began the rule of the Wangchuck dynasty which has continued on successfully to its present Monarch Jigme Khesar Namgyal Wangchuck who is the fifth in the royal bloodline. This history is testament to the case that even a small nation state of less than a million can be successful in every sense of the word and can evolve from theocracy to absolute monarchy to democracy without any form of turmoil or anarchy.

 

The only country today with Mahayana Buddhism as its state religion, Bhutan had been as mythical as it was unknown to the outside world, save for Tibet and the bordering states of India with whom it had early trade affiliations. By opening diplomatic ties with India, Bhutan officially ended its centuries-old isolation from the outside world. This wise and calculated move by the Third Monarch, Druk Gyalpo Jigme Dorji Wangchuck was a stepping stone in the country’s advent into modernization. After constructing the first motor road which connected the country’s capital Thimphu to India in the early 1960’s, a new chapter in Bhutan’s history began; the country was admitted to the United Nations Organization (UNO) in 1971, after attending as an observer for three years. Through initiatives at the national level coupled with foreign assistance, the country has seen major reforms in all sectors making life much more comfortable for the people.

 

Today Bhutan is a steadily developing nation. But even today Bhutan jealously guards its lifestyle and ancient traditions, opening its doors with caution and wisdom. And despite the fast paced metamorphism into a modern state, the Bhutanese have not been overwhelmed by all that the marvels of modern science have to offer; they still hold dear the age-old tradition and customs passed on by their ancestors, practiced in earnest at every moment of their lives.